Mentor and student relationship

mentor and student relationship

A mentor is someone who has already walked down the path you think you might be interested in and as such can help guide and maybe even inspire you. Nurs Stand. May ;20(37) The student-mentor relationship: a review of the literature. Wilkes Z(1). Author information: (1)University of Hull, Hull. relationship between student-teachers and their mentors is very delicate, in some cases even cold and lame. The mentor teacher is the one that.

mentor and student relationship

In modern times, the concept of mentoring has found application in virtually every forum of learning. In academics, mentor is often used synonymously with faculty adviser.

mentor and student relationship

A fundamental difference between mentoring and advising is more than advising; mentoring is a personal, as well as, professional relationship. An adviser might or might not be a mentor, depending on the quality of the relationship. A mentoring relationship develops over an extended period, during which a student's needs and the nature of the relationship tend to change.

A mentor will try to be aware of these changes and vary the degree and type of attention, help, advice, information, and encouragement that he or she provides. In the broad sense intended here, a mentor is someone who takes a special interest in helping another person de- Page 2 Share Cite Suggested Citation: Adviser, Teacher, Role Model, Friend: The National Academies Press. Some students, particularly those working in large laboratories and institutions, find it difficult to develop a close relationship with their faculty adviser or laboratory director.

They might have to find their mentor elsewhere-perhaps a fellow student, another faculty member, a wise friend, or another person with experience who offers continuing guidance and support. In the realm of science and engineering, we might say that a good mentor seeks to help a student optimize an educational experience, to assist the student's socialization into a disciplinary culture, and to help the student find suitable employment. These obligations can extend well beyond formal schooling and continue into or through the student's career.

The Council of Graduate Schools cites Morris Zelditch's useful summary of a mentor's multiple roles: Good mentors are able to share life experiences and wisdom, as well as technical expertise.

They are good listeners, good observers, and good problem-solvers.

Mentorship - Wikipedia

They make an effort to know, accept, and respect the goals and interests of a student. In the end, they establish an environment in which the student's accomplishment is limited only by the extent of his or her talent.

Page 3 Share Cite Suggested Citation: In general, however, each relationship must be based on a common goal: You as mentor can also benefit enormously. Different students will require different amounts and kinds of attention, advice, information, and encouragement.

Some students will feel comfortable approaching their mentors; others will be shy, intimidated, or reluctant to seek help. A good mentor is approachable and available. Often students will not know what questions to ask, what information they need, or what their options are especially when applying to graduate programs.

A good mentor can lessen such confusion by getting to know students and being familiar with the kinds of suggestions and information that can be useful. In long-term relationships, friendships form naturally; students can gradually become colleagues. At the same time, strive as a mentor to be aware of the distinction between friendship and favoritism. You might need to remind a student-and yourself-that you need a degree of objectivity in giving fair grades and evaluations.

If you are unsure whether a relationship is "too personal," you are probably not alone. Consult with the department chair, your own mentor, or others you trust. You might have to increase the mentor-student distance.

Students, for their part, need to understand the professional pressures and time constraints faced by their mentors and not view them as merely a means-or impediment-to their goal. For many faculty, mentoring is not their primary responsibility; in fact, time spent with students can be time taken from their own research. Students are obliged to recognize the multiple demands on a mentor's time. At the same time, effective mentoring need not always require large amounts of time.

An experienced, perceptive mentor can provide great help in just a few minutes by mak- Page 5 Share Cite Suggested Citation: This section seeks to describe the mentoring relationship by listing several aspects of good mentoring practice.

Historical[ edit ] William Blake's watercolor of "Age teaching youth", a Romantic representation of mentorship. Blake represented this type of relationship in many of his works, including the illustrations of his Songs of Innocence. The original object is currently held by Tate Britain [13] The roots of the practice are lost in antiquity.

The word itself was inspired by the character of Mentor in Homer 's Odyssey. Though the actual Mentor in the story is a somewhat ineffective old man, the goddess Athena takes on his appearance in order to guide young Telemachus in his time of difficulty. Historically significant systems of mentorship include the guru—disciple tradition [14] practiced in Hinduism and BuddhismEldersthe discipleship system practiced by Rabbinical Judaism and the Christian church [15]and apprenticing under the medieval guild system [16].

In the United States, advocates for workplace equity in the second half of the twentieth century popularized the term "mentor" and concept of career mentorship as part of a larger social capital lexicon which also includes terms such as glass ceilingbamboo ceiling, [17] networkingrole modeland gatekeeper —serving to identify and address the problems barring non-dominant groups from professional success.

Mainstream business literature subsequently adopted the terms and concepts, promoting them as pathways to success for all career climbers. Inthese terms were not in the general American vocabulary; by the mids they had become part of everyday speech. Sowing is necessary when you know that what you say may not be understood or even acceptable to learners at first but will make sense and have value to the mentee when the situation requires it.

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Here the mentor chooses to plunge the learner right into change, provoking a different way of thinking, a change in identity or a re-ordering of values. You show what you are talking about, you show by your own behavior. The key questions here are: Different techniques may be used by mentors according to the situation and the mindset of the mentee, and the techniques used in modern organizations can be found in ancient education systems, from the Socratic technique of harvesting to the accompaniment method of learning used in the apprenticeship of itinerant cathedral builders during the Middle Ages.

Posner [23] advise mentors to look for "teachable moments" in order to "expand or realize the potentialities of the people in the organizations they lead" and underline that personal credibility is as essential to quality mentoring as skill.

A senior editor mentors a junior editor. A new and upcoming trend is having multiple mentors. Having more than one mentor will widen the knowledge of the person being mentored.

The student-mentor relationship: a review of the literature.

There are different mentors who may have different strengths. Profession or trade mentor: They know the trends, important changes and new practices that you should know to stay at the top of your career.

A mentor like this would be someone you can discuss ideas regarding the field, and also be introduced to key and important people that you should know. This is someone who doesn't just focus on the profession. This mentor will be able to give insight on the industry as a whole. Whether it be research, development or key changes in the industry, you need to know.

Politics in the organizations are constantly changing. It is important to be knowledgeable about the values, strategies and products that are within your company, but also when these things are changing. An organization mentor can clarify missions and strategies, and give clarity when needed. This mentor can speed quickly over the bumps, and cut through the unnecessary work.

This mentor can explain the 'ins and outs' of projects, day to day tasks, and eliminate unnecessary things that may be currently going on in your work day. This mentor can help to get things done quickly and efficiently. This is an up-and-coming, incredibly important position.

A Good Mentor Is ...

Technology has been rapidly improving, and becoming more a part of day to day transactions within companies. In order to perform your best, you must know how to get things done on the newest technology. A technology mentor will help with technical breakdowns, advise on systems that may work better than what you're currently using, and coach you through new technology and how to best use it and implement it into your daily life.

These mentors are only examples. There can be many more different types of mentors. Look around your workplace, your life, and see who is an expert that you can learn something from. Relevant discussion may be found on Template talk: Please improve it by verifying the claims made and adding inline citations. Statements consisting only of original research should be removed. February Learn how and when to remove this template message Some elements of mentoring.

There are two broad types of mentoring relationships: While formal mentoring systems contain numerous structural and guidance elements, they still typically allow the mentor and mentee to have an active role in choosing who they want to work with.

Formal mentoring programs which simply assign mentors to mentees without giving these individuals a say have not performed well. Even though a mentor and a mentee may seem perfectly matched "on paper", in practice, they may have different working or learning styles. As such, giving the mentor and the mentee the opportunity to help select who they want to work with is a widely used approach. Informal mentoring occurs without the use of structured recruitment, mentor training and matching services.

Informal mentoring arrangements can develop naturally from business networking situations in which a more experienced individual meets a new employee, and the two strike up a rapport. In addition to these broad types, there are also peer, situational and supervisory mentoring relationships. Informal relationships develop on their own between partners. Formal mentoring, on the other hand, refers to a structured process supported by the organization and addressed to target populations.

Youth mentoring programs assist at-risk children or youth who lack role models and sponsors [25]. In business, formal mentoring is part of talent management strategies which are used to groom key employees, newly hired graduates, high potential-employees and future leaders.

The matching of mentor and mentee is often done by a mentoring coordinator, often with the help of a computerized database registry.

The student-mentor relationship: a review of the literature.

The use of the database helps to match up mentees with mentors who have the type of experience and qualifications they are seeking. A woman provides mentoring at the Youth For Change program. There are formal mentoring programs that are values-oriented, while social mentoring and other types focus specifically on career development. Some mentorship programs provide both social and vocational support.

In Metizo created the first mentoring certification for companies and business schools in order to guarantee the integrity and effectiveness of formal mentoring. Certification is attributed jointly by the organization and an external expert.

These mentoring relationships vary [27] and can be influenced by the type of mentoring relationship that is in effect. That is whether it has come about as a formal or informal relationship. Also there are several models have been used to describe and examine the sub-relationships that can emerge.

For example, Buell describes how mentoring relationships can develop under a cloning model, nurturing model, friendship model and apprenticeship model. The cloning model is about the mentor trying to "produce a duplicate copy of him or her self. However, one person may be more knowledgeable in a certain aspect or another, but they can help each other to progress in their work.

A lot of time, peer relationships provide a lot of support, empathy and advice because the situations are quite similar. Short-term relationships in which a person mentors for a specific purpose.

This could be a company bringing an expert in regarding social media, or internet safety. This expert can mentor employees to make them more knowledgeable about a specific topic or skill. This kind of mentoring has'go to' people who are supervisors. These are people who have answers to many questions, and can advise to take the best plan of action. This can be a conflict of interest relationship because many supervisors do not feel comfortable also being a mentor.

Participants from all levels of the organization propose and own a topic. They then meet in groups to discuss the topic, which motivates them to grow and become more knowledgeable.

Flash mentoring is ideal for job shadowing, reverse mentoring, and more. Creates a low-pressure environment for mentoring that focuses on single meetings rather than a traditional, long-term mentoring relationship.

Meta-analysis of individual research studies found mentoring has significant behavioral, attitudinal, health-related, relational, motivational, and career benefits. Originally, the concept of mentoring functions was developed based on qualitative research in a organizational context with functions being subsumed under two major factors: Setting up a career development mentoring program for employees enables an organization to help junior employees to learn the skills and behaviours from senior employees that the junior employees need to advance to higher-responsibility positions.

This type of mentoring program can help to align organizational goals with employees' personal career goals of progressing within the organization.

mentor and student relationship

It gives employees the ability to advance professionally and learn more about their work. This collaboration also gives employees a feeling of engagement with the organization, which can lead to better retention rates and increased employee satisfaction.

The most talented employees in organizations tend to be difficult to retain, as they are usually seeking greater challenges and responsibilities, and they are likely to leave for a different organization if they do not feel that they are being given the opportunity to develop. Top talent, whether in an innovation or management role, have incredible potential to make great things happen for an organization.

Creating a mentoring program for high-potential employees that gives them one-on-one guidance from senior leaders can help to build the engagement of these talented employees, give them the opportunity to develop, and increase their retention in the organization. One of the top ways to innovate is by bringing in new ideas from senior employees and leaders from underrepresented groups e. Who is an underrepresented group depends on the industry sector and country. In many Western countries, women and ethnic minorities are significantly underrepresented in executive positions and boards of directors.

  • Mentorship

In some traditionally gender segregated occupations, such as education and nursinghowever, women may be the dominant gender in the workforce. Mentors from underrepresented groups can empower employees from underrepresented groups to increase their confidence to take on higher-responsibility tasks and prepare for leadership roles. By developing employees from diverse groups, this can give the organization access to new ideas, new ways of looking at problems, and new perspectives.

This also brings cultural awareness and intercultural dialogue into the workplace.