Jane and elizabeth bennet relationship quotes

Pride and Prejudice - Wikiquote

jane and elizabeth bennet relationship quotes

“I have an excessive regard for Jane Bennet, she is really a very sweet “He is also handsome,” replied Elizabeth, “which a young man ought. Pride and Prejudice () is a novel of manners by Jane Austen. Quotes[edit] Mr Darcy to Mr. Bingley about Elizabeth Bennet, in Ch. 3 able to overcome a sentiment so natural as abhorrence against relationship with Wickham. Jane and Elizabeth Bennet are two of the closest Bennett sisters, both in age and in emotional disposition. They are very attached to one another and willingly.

He was at the same time haughty, reserved, and fastidious, and his manners, though well-bred, were not inviting. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us. Elizabeth, about Bingley Ch.

If the dispositions of the parties are ever so well known to each other or ever so similar beforehand, it does not advance their felicity in the least.

They always continue to grow sufficiently unlike afterwards to have their share of vexation; and it is better to know as little as possible of the defects of the person with whom you are to pass your life.

You know it is not sound, and that you would never act in this way yourself. Bingley's attentions to her sister, Elizabeth was far from suspecting that she was herself becoming an object of some interest in the eyes of his friend.

jane and elizabeth bennet relationship quotes

Darcy had at first scarcely allowed her to be pretty; he had looked at her without admiration at the ball; and when they next met, he looked at her only to criticise. But no sooner had he made it clear to himself and his friends that she hardly had a good feature in her face, than he began to find it was rendered uncommonly intelligent by the beautiful expression of her dark eyes.

To this discovery succeeded some others equally mortifying. Though he had detected with a critical eye more than one failure of perfect symmetry in her form, he was forced to acknowledge her figure to be light and pleasing; and in spite of his asserting that her manners were not those of the fashionable world, he was caught by their easy playfulness.

Of this she was perfectly unaware; to her he was only the man who made himself agreeable nowhere, and who had not thought her handsome enough to dance with. My mind was more agreeably engaged. I have been meditating on the very great pleasure which a pair of fine eyes in the face of a pretty woman can bestow. Darcy to Miss Bingley, Ch. This is the only point, I flatter myself, on which we do not agree. I had hoped that our sentiments coincided in every particular, but I must so far differ from you as to think our two youngest daughters uncommonly foolish.

They each have their advantages, and I can be equally happy in either. She felt all the perverseness of the mischance that should bring him where no one else was brought, and, to prevent its ever happening again, took care to inform him at first that it was a favourite haunt of hers. How it could occur a second time, therefore, was very odd! Yet it did, and even a third. It seemed like wilful ill-nature, or a voluntary penance, for on these occasions it was not merely a few formal inquiries and an awkward pause and then away, but he actually thought it necessary to turn back and walk with her.

It is often only carelessness of opinion, and sometimes an indirect boast. What he told me was merely this: Darcy give you reasons for this interference?

jane and elizabeth bennet relationship quotes

Darcy, to allow nothing for the influence of friendship and affection. He really believed, that were it not for the inferiority of her connections, he should be in some danger. Darcy had to decide on the propriety of his friend's inclination, or why, upon his own judgement alone, he was to determine and direct in what manner his friend was to be happy.

But," she continued, recollecting herself, "as we know none of the particulars, it is not fair to condemn him. It is not to be supposed that there was much affection in the case.

She stared, coloured, doubted, and was silent.

The character of Jane Bennet in Pride and Prejudice from LitCharts | The creators of SparkNotes

This he considered sufficient encouragement; and the avowal of all that he felt, and had long felt for her, immediately followed. He spoke well; but there were feelings besides those of the heart to be detailed; and he was not more eloquent on the subject of tenderness than of pride.

His sense of her inferiority—of its being a degradation—of the family obstacles which judgement had always opposed to inclination, were dwelt on with a warmth which seemed due to the consequence he was wounding, but was very unlikely to recommend his suit. She tried, however, to compose herself to answer him with patience, when he should have done. He concluded with representing to her the strength of that attachment which, in spite of all his endeavours, he had found impossible to conquer; and with expressing his hope that it would now be rewarded by her acceptance of his hand.

As he said this, she could easily see that he had no doubt of a favourable answer. He spoke of apprehension and anxiety, but his countenance expressed real security. Such a circumstance could only exasperate farther, and, when he ceased, the colour rose into her cheeks, and she said: It is natural that obligation should be felt, and if I could feel gratitude, I would now thank you. But I cannot—I have never desired your good opinion, and you have certainly bestowed it most unwillingly.

I am sorry to have occasioned pain to anyone. It has been most unconsciously done, however, and I hope will be of short duration.

The feelings which, you tell me, have long prevented the acknowledgment of your regard, can have little difficulty in overcoming it after this explanation.

The pause was to Elizabeth's feelings dreadful. At length, with a voice of forced calmness, he said: I might, perhaps, wish to be informed why, with so little endeavour at civility, I am thus rejected.

But it is of small importance. Was not this some excuse for incivility, if I was uncivil? But I have other provocations. You know I have. Had not my feelings decided against you—had they been indifferent, or had they even been favourable, do you think that any consideration would tempt me to accept the man who has been the means of ruining, perhaps for ever, the happiness of a most beloved sister?

No motive can excuse the unjust and ungenerous part you acted there.

Elizabeth Bennet Quotes (41 quotes)

You dare not, you cannot deny, that you have been the principal, if not the only means of dividing them from each other—of exposing one to the censure of the world for caprice and instability, and the other to its derision for disappointed hopes, and involving them both in misery of the acutest kind. Towards him I have been kinder than towards myself. Long before it had taken place my opinion of you was decided.

This is the estimation in which you hold me! I thank you for explaining it so fully. My faults, according to this calculation, are heavy indeed! But perhaps," added he, stopping in his walk, and turning towards her, "these offenses might have been overlooked, had not your pride been hurt by my honest confession of the scruples that had long prevented my forming any serious design.

These bitter accusations might have been suppressed, had I, with greater policy, concealed my struggles, and flattered you into the belief of my being impelled by unqualified, unalloyed inclination; by reason, by reflection, by everything. But disguise of every sort is my abhorrence. Nor am I ashamed of the feelings I related. They were natural and just. Could you expect me to rejoice in the inferiority of your connections? Darcy has no defect.

He owns it himself without disguise. I have faults enough, but they are not, I hope, of understanding. My temper I dare not vouch for. It is, I believe, too little yielding—certainly too little for the convenience of the world. I cannot forget the follies and vices of other so soon as I ought, nor their offenses against myself. My feelings are not puffed about with every attempt to move them. My temper would perhaps be called resentful.

My good opinion once lost is lost forever. But you have chosen your fault well. I really cannot laugh at it. You are safe from me. She knew not how to support herself, and from actual weakness sat down and cried for half-an-hour. Her astonishment, as she reflected on what had passed, was increased by every review of it. That she should receive an offer of marriage from Mr. That he should have been in love with her for so many months!

So much in love as to wish to marry her in spite of all the objections which had made him prevent his friend's marrying her sister, and which must appear at least with equal force in his own case—was almost incredible! It was gratifying to have inspired unconsciously so strong an affection. But his pride, his abominable pride—his shameless avowal of what he had done with respect to Jane—his unpardonable assurance in acknowledging, though he could not justify it, and the unfeeling manner in which he had mentioned Mr.

Wickham, his cruelty towards whom he had not attempted to deny, soon overcame the pity which the consideration of his attachment had for a moment excited. Collins had only to change from Jane to Elizabeth—and it was soon done—done while Mrs. Bennet was stirring the fire. Darcy, you see, is the man! Now, Lizzy, I think I have surprised you. Could he, or the Lucases, have pitched on any man within the circle of our acquaintance, whose name would have given the lie more effectually to what they related?

Darcy, who never looks at any woman but to see a blemish, and who probably never looked at you in his life! Never had his wit been directed in a manner so little agreeable to her. Much as I abominate writing, I would not give up Mr.

Collins's correspondence for any consideration. The happiness which this reply produced, was such as he had probably never felt before; and he expressed himself on the occasion as sensibly and as warmly as a man violently in love can be supposed to do. Had Elizabeth been able to encounter his eye, she might have seen how well the expression of heartfelt delight, diffused over his face, became him; but, though she could not look, she could listen, and he told her of feelings, which, in proving of what importance she was to him, made his affection every moment more valuable.

They walked on, without knowing in what direction. There was too much to be thought, and felt, and said, for attention to any other objects. I knew enough of your disposition to be certain that, had you been absolutely, irrevocably decided against me, you would have acknowledged it to Lady Catherine, frankly and openly.

After abusing you so abominably to your face, I could have no scruple in abusing you to all your relations. The recollection of what I then said, of my conduct, my manners, my expressions during the whole of it, is now, and has been many months, inexpressibly painful to me.

Your reproof, so well applied, I shall never forget: You know not, you can scarcely conceive, how they have tortured me;—though it was some time, I confess, before I was reasonable enough to allow their justice. The turn of your countenance I shall never forget, as you said that I could not have addressed you in any possible way that would induce you to accept me.

The adieu is charity itself. But think no more of the letter. The feelings of the person who wrote, and the person who received it, are now so widely different from what they were then, that every unpleasant circumstance attending it ought to be forgotten.

You must learn some of my philosophy. Think only of the past as its remembrance gives you pleasure. Your retrospections must be so totally void of reproach, that the contentment arising from them is not of philosophy, but, what is much better, of innocence. But with me, it is not so.

Painful recollections will intrude which cannot, which ought not, to be repelled. I have been a selfish being all my life, in practice, though not in principle. As a child I was taught what was right, but I was not taught to correct my temper.

I was given good principles, but left to follow them in pride and conceit. Unfortunately an only son for many years an only childI was spoilt by my parents, who, though good themselves my father, particularly, all that was benevolent and amiableallowed, encouraged, almost taught me to be selfish and overbearing; to care for none beyond my own family circle; to think meanly of all the rest of the world; to wish at least to think meanly of their sense and worth compared with my own.

jane and elizabeth bennet relationship quotes

Such I was, from eight to eight and twenty; and such I might still have been but for you, dearest, loveliest Elizabeth! What do I not owe you! You taught me a lesson, hard indeed at first, but most advantageous.

By you, I was properly humbled. I came to you without a doubt of my reception. You showed me how insufficient were all my pretensions to please a woman worthy of being pleased. How soon any other wishes introduced themselves I can hardly tell, but I believe in about half an hour after I had seen you.

Darcy so bad as this—though I have never liked him. I had not thought so very ill of him. I had supposed him to be despising his fellow-creatures in general, but did not suspect him of descending to such malicious revenge, such injustice, such inhumanity as this. Darcy has not made him just to you! It has connected him nearer with virtue than any other feeling. But we are none of us consistent; and in his behaviour to me, there were stronger impulses even than pride.

It has often led him to be liberal and generous,—to give his money freely, to display hospitality, to assist his tenants, and relieve the poor. Family pride, and filial pride, for he is very proud of what his father was, have done this. Not to appear to disgrace his family, to degenerate from the popular qualities, or lose the influence of the Pemberley House, is a powerful motive.

He has also brotherly pride, which with some brotherly affection, makes him a very kind and careful guardian of his sister; and you will hear him generally cried up as the most attentive and best of brothers. It is, in short, impossible for us to conjecture the causes or circumstances which may have alienated them, without actual blame on either side. Do clear them too, or we shall be obliged to think ill of somebody. It is settled between us already, that we are to be the happiest couple in the world.

But are you pleased, Jane? Shall you like to have such a brother? Nothing could give either Bingley or myself more delight. But we considered it, we talked of it as impossible. And do you really love him quite well enough? Are you quite sure that you feel what you ought to do?

You will only think I feel more than I ought to do, when I tell you all. He privately tells Mrs. Bennet his intentions, and she redirects his target from Jane, whom she hopes will marry Bingley, to Elizabeth.

Collins obligingly agrees to shift his Jane cannot believe that Darcy could be so blameworthy and that there Lydia and Kitty are overjoyed. Jane is excited to see Bingley, while Elizabeth looks forward to dancing with Wickham, though Mr Jane, who has been speaking to Bingley, tells Elizabeth the same story: Bennet talking about Jane and Bingley like they're already married.

Mary insists on playing the piano, and does so Bennet tries to find support from anyone else: Jane, who keeps out of it, and then Charlotte Lucas, who has just arrived to visit Upstairs, Jane shares the contents of the letter with Elizabeth Jane writes to Caroline.

Elizabeth Bennet Quotes

Bingley will certainly be gone for awhile and everyone is delighted with Darcy's sister, Georgiana. Jane tries to put on a brave face, telling Elizabeth that Bingley has not wronged her She cites him and Charlotte as examples of human inconsistency. But Jane tells Elizabeth she judges them too harshly.

Gardiner is a tradesman in London. Gardiner is intelligent and extremely well-liked by Jane and Elizabeth. Bennet's outpouring of complaints, Mrs. Gardiner speaks with Elizabeth about Jane's situation. Elizabeth confirms that Jane was very much in love and swears that Bingley's departure Gardiner proposes that Jane come stay with them in London to help her recovery.

Elizabeth go to visit Charlotte, stopping along the way in London to check up on Jane. Speaking privately with Elizabeth, Mrs.